Peacemakesplenty

cognitivedissonance:

Tonight in Ferguson, Mo. Even CNN is calling out police brutality.

We are watching history unfold. Do not stand down. Spread the word.

No justice, no peace.

(via shes-deadly)

— 1 day ago with 111420 notes

priceofliberty:

princesswhatevr:

firmeprincess:

fuuuuuck smh

America is a war machine

military-industrial-complex ain’t gonna fund itself

(via america-wakiewakie)

— 1 day ago with 31168 notes
sailorgil:

" British Warship Diagram "  …  Ship-of-the-Line

sailorgil:

" British Warship Diagram "  …  Ship-of-the-Line

(Source: merryfarmer.net, via peashooter85)

— 1 week ago with 156 notes
absenteism:

extract. more soon. bises

absenteism:

extract. more soon. bises

(via jekyllcomplex)

— 1 week ago with 2707 notes
reku-a-day:

329th day

June,12,20132013-06-12 00:00

reku-a-day:

329th day

June,12,2013
2013-06-12 00:00

(via net-runner)

— 1 week ago with 204 notes
wildcat2030:

When Robots Take All the Work, What’ll Be Left for Us to Do?
-
Robots have loomed over the future of labor for decades—at least since robotic arms started replacing auto workers on the assembly line in the early 1960s. Optimists say that more robots will lead to greater productivity and economic growth, while pessimists complain that huge swaths of the labor force will see their employment options automated out of existence. Each has a point, but there’s another way to look at this seemingly inevitable trend. What if both are right? As robots start doing more and more of the work humans used to do, and doing it so much more efficiently than we ever did, what if the need for jobs disappears altogether? What if the robots end up producing more than enough of everything that everyone needs? The redefinition of work itself is one of the most intriguing possibilities imagined in a recent Pew Research report on the future of robots and jobs. Certainly, the prospect of a robot-powered, post-scarcity future of mandatory mass leisure feels like a far-off scenario, and an edge case even then. In the present, ensuring that everyone has enough often seems harder for humans to accomplish than producing enough in the first place. But assuming a future that looks more like Star Trek than Blade Runner, a lot of people could end up with a lot more time on their hands. In that case, robots won’t just be taking our jobs; they’ll be forcing us to confront a major existential dilemma: if we didn’t have to work anymore, what would we do? The answer is both a quantitative and qualitative exercise in defining what makes human intelligence distinct from the artificial kind, a definition that seems to keep getting narrower. And in the end, we might figure out that a job-free roboticized future is even scarier than it sounds. (via When Robots Take All the Work, What’ll Be Left for Us to Do? | Business | WIRED)

wildcat2030:

When Robots Take All the Work, What’ll Be Left for Us to Do?
-
Robots have loomed over the future of labor for decades—at least since robotic arms started replacing auto workers on the assembly line in the early 1960s. Optimists say that more robots will lead to greater productivity and economic growth, while pessimists complain that huge swaths of the labor force will see their employment options automated out of existence. Each has a point, but there’s another way to look at this seemingly inevitable trend. What if both are right? As robots start doing more and more of the work humans used to do, and doing it so much more efficiently than we ever did, what if the need for jobs disappears altogether? What if the robots end up producing more than enough of everything that everyone needs? The redefinition of work itself is one of the most intriguing possibilities imagined in a recent Pew Research report on the future of robots and jobs. Certainly, the prospect of a robot-powered, post-scarcity future of mandatory mass leisure feels like a far-off scenario, and an edge case even then. In the present, ensuring that everyone has enough often seems harder for humans to accomplish than producing enough in the first place. But assuming a future that looks more like Star Trek than Blade Runner, a lot of people could end up with a lot more time on their hands. In that case, robots won’t just be taking our jobs; they’ll be forcing us to confront a major existential dilemma: if we didn’t have to work anymore, what would we do? The answer is both a quantitative and qualitative exercise in defining what makes human intelligence distinct from the artificial kind, a definition that seems to keep getting narrower. And in the end, we might figure out that a job-free roboticized future is even scarier than it sounds. (via When Robots Take All the Work, What’ll Be Left for Us to Do? | Business | WIRED)

— 1 week ago with 52 notes
The last post raised questions as to what my ad revenue is.

peashooter85:

Since major corporations must publish financial info to their stockholders, I find it only fair I disclose how much revenue this blog makes to my followers.

There are lean periods and fat periods.  Last month was a lean month, this month is looking to be a fat month.  During lean periods I typically earn around 50 cents to a dollar a day.  During fat periods its around 2-3 dollars a day.  The most I ever made was $10 in one day.  On really sucky days I might only make 10-12 cents.  

Big money!!!!

image

— 1 week ago with 36 notes